Researcher and Writer in Washington, DC

GAO versus the ghost of OTA: Who will win the science and technology assessment race?

Source: R Street Institute, based upon Quorum.us data.

Hardly anyone would argue that Congress is well equipped to make technology policy. Very few members are techies, and let’s face it, innovation is hurtling forward at a mind-blowing pace. Nor is Congress and its basic modus operandi — serving as a bargaining arena for diverse interests — particularly congenial to the use of data and evidence in decision making.

So it is that a motley crew (including myself)  began banging the gong for expanding Congress’ technology and science capacity. One can’t make every representative and senator savvy in cutting edge innovations; but we can surround them with nonpartisan staff who do know tech and science….(Read more)

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