Researcher and Writer in Washington, DC

ICYMI: Why We Love Amateurs in the White House

Source: TheAtlantic.com

Source: TheAtlantic.com

Jonathan Rauch’s late 2015 piece on this subject is worth a read (or re-read). Here are a few highlights:

“The presidency, it’s often said, is a job for which everyone arrives unprepared. But just how unprepared is unprepared enough?”

“It is well known that to be elected president, you pretty much have to have been a governor or a U.S. senator. What McConnell had figured out was this: No one gets elected president who needs longer than 14 years to get from his or her first gubernatorial or Senate victory to either the presidency or the vice presidency.* Surprised, I scoured the history books and found that the rule works astonishingly well going back to the early 20th century, when the modern era of presidential electioneering began.”

“Starting in 1996, the candidate with more experience begins consistently losing. Moreover, as the trend lines show, the inexperience premium has increased over time. That makes some sense: As voters have grown angrier with government, they have become more receptive to outsiders. Republicans, in general, are especially angry with government, so no one will be surprised to learn that since 1980 their presidential candidates have had, on average, three to four years’ less experience than the Democrats’ candidates.”

Read more at TheAtlantic.com.

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