Researcher and Writer in Washington, DC

Six Quick Takes On President Trump’s Speech

White House photographer, Official White House Facebook page

#1 Thank you for making your speech short. Really, the days when folks enjoyed hearing long orations have passed.

#2 I am glad you thanked the Obamas for being “magnificent” to you during the transition. Offering “gracious aid” to an incoming president is part of the orderly transfer of government. I hope you’ll be as helpful when your time to depart comes.

#3 These statements are true and I hope you work with Congress to do something about it: “Americans want great schools for their children, safe neighborhoods for their families and good jobs for themselves … But for too many of our citizens, a different reality exists.”

….Read more at the R Street Institute Blog

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Similar posts
  • Why I like voting by mail It has been a few years since I queued up at a polling place, and I am the happier for it. Don’t get me wrong, I am a sucker for the pageantry: citizen volunteers man polling places; activists outside hand out flyers in hopes of swinging votes; I get a little sticker to wear proudly [...]
  • Bring in the nerds: Reviving the Offi... Read it [...]
  • The Russia Investigation: Why the Ove... What’s going on with the Russia investigation? For most of us, the answer likely is, “Beats me.” It seems every week or two there’s a media report about Congress holding a hearing or some member of Team Trump or other person being called in to testify: James Comey, Paul Manafort, Donald Trump Jr. The facts [...]
  • CRS Should Stop Fighting Access to It... The Congressional Research Service plays an essential role in policymaking and oversight. It makes Congress smarter about issues and teaches new legislators how to legislate. I would not have spent 11 years working at CRS if I did not think very highly of the institution. But there is one topic on which the widely esteemed [...]
  • How the Coming Republican Congress Co... For the better part of eight years, Republicans have tried to stop the Obama administration from issuing new regulations. They have not had much success. But this may well change in January, when President-elect Donald Trump arrives in the Oval Office. Congress’ primary regulation-whacking tool is the Congressional Review Act (CRA), a bipartisan statute enacted [...]