Researcher and Writer in Washington, DC

Yes, Congress Has a Role In Foreign Affairs

Emerging from the White House are Senator Charles L. McNary, Minority leader; Sen. Warren Austin of Vermont; Sen. Key Pittman, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee; Sen. William E. Borah of Idaho, and Secretary of State Cordell Hull (1939). Source: Library of Congress.

Emerging from the White House are Senator Charles L. McNary, Minority leader; Sen. Warren Austin of Vermont; Sen. Key Pittman, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee; Sen. William E. Borah of Idaho, and Secretary of State Cordell Hull (1939). Source: Library of Congress.

As the U.S. Congress this week continues to debate legislation to address President Barack Obama’s proposed nuclear deal with Iran, some critics howl that the bill would usurp presidential authority. They are very wrong.

The Iran Nuclear Review Agreement Act, or S.615, is modest. The measure, introduced by Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn, sets no negotiating terms, nor does it force the president to define the deal as a treaty subject to approval by two-thirds of the Senate. Instead, it asks the president to submit the proposed agreement and a report to Congress, and then to permit a vote. If the legislature approves the deal, it is done and Obama wins. If it disapproves, Obama can veto the resolution, and Congress likely does not have the votes to override that veto. Again, Obama wins. If Congress fails to vote within 60 days, the agreement, yet again, is approved. Once more, Obama wins.

So what is the big deal? Some observers have gotten it into their heads that the president should have an unfettered hand in foreign affairs… (read more at RealClearWorld.com)

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